CTE Glossary & Acronyms

CCASN – COLLEGE AND CAREER ACADEMY SUPPORT NETWORK

http://casn.berkeley.edu/

Since 1998 CCASN has been working to increase educational opportunities that offer each young person support and guidance, productive engagement in the world outside of school, and preparation for both college and careers. This research-based strategy has been effective for hundreds of thousands of teenagers, including low-income students of color.

CCASN offers professional development, coaching, resource materials, and technical assistance for secondary educators, schools, and districts. CCASN also conducts research to document and improve practice, and advises policy makers at all levels.

UCCI – UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA CURRICULUM INTEGRATION

http://ucci.ucop.edu/integrated-courses/index.html

University of California Curriculum Integration is an initiative of Student Affairs, Admissions (High School Articulation) at the UC Office of the President, with funding administered by the California Department of Education.The UCCI program is dedicated to supporting California high schools as they work to prepare students for success in college and in life. As a part of UC’s systemwide High School Articulation unit, the UCCI program focuses on assisting high schools with the development and implementation of integrated courses that unite academic study with Career Technical Education.

CBEDS – CALIFORNIA BASIC EDUCATIONAL DATA SYSTEMS

http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/dc/cb/

The California Basic Educational Data System (CBEDS) is an annual data collection administered in October. CBEDS data are reported through an Online Reporting Application called CBEDS-ORA. The purpose of CBEDS is to collect data about schools and districts, as well as some aggregate data on students and staff.

PLTW – PROJECT LEAD THE WAY

https://www.pltw.org/

By working together, we can solve America’s workforce development crisis. We are thankful for the many corporations, philanthropic organizations, and individuals who support Project Lead The Way. Together, we are preparing students for the global economy.

STEM – SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATH

http://www.ed.gov/stem

The United States has developed as a global leader, in large part, through the genius and hard work of its scientists, engineers, and innovators. In a world that’s becoming increasingly complex, where success is driven not only by what you know, but by what you can do with what you know, it’s more important than ever for our youth to be equipped with the knowledge and skills to solve tough problems, gather and evaluate evidence, and make sense of information. These are the types of skills that students learn by studying science, technology, engineering, and math—subjects collectively known as STEM.

STEAM – SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, (ARTS), AND MATH

http://stemtosteam.org/

What is STEAM?

In this climate of economic uncertainty, America is once again turning to innovation as the way to ensure a prosperous future.

Yet innovation remains tightly coupled with Science, Technology, Engineering and Math – the STEM subjects. Art + Design are poised to transform our economy in the 21st century just as science and technology did in the last century.

We need to add Art + Design to the equation — to transform STEM into STEAM

 

LCFF – LOCAL CONTROL FUNDING FORMULA

http://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/aa/lc/lcfffaq.asp#FC

How is the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) different from what was in place under revenue limits?(Revised 04-Dec-2015)

One of the goals of the LCFF is to simplify how state funding is provided to local educational agencies (LEAs). Under the old funding system, each school district was funded based on a unique revenue limit, multiplied by its average daily attendance (ADA). In addition, districts received restricted funding for over 50 categorical programs which were designed to provide targeted services based on the demographics and needs of the students in each district.

Under the LCFF funding system, revenue limits and most state categorical programs have been eliminated. The LCFF creates funding targets based on student characteristics and provides greater flexibility to use these funds to improve student outcomes. For school districts and charter schools, the LCFF funding targets consist of grade span-specific base grants plus supplemental and concentration grants that are calculated based on student demographic factors. For county offices of education (COEs), the LCFF funding targets consist of an amount for COE oversight activities and instructional programs.

LCAP – LOCAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTABILITY PLAN

http://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/aa/lc/lcfffaq.asp#LCAP

What is the Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP)?

The LCAP is an important component of the LCFF. Under the LCFF all LEAs are required to prepare an LCAP, which describes how they intend to meet annual goals for all pupils, with specific activities to address state and local priorities identified pursuant to EC Section 52060(d).

RC – REGIONAL CONSORTIA

http://doingwhatmatters.cccco.edu/Contact.aspx

http://doingwhatmatters.cccco.edu/WEDDGrants/GranteeRoles.aspx#rc

Key Talent that lead the Regional Consortia to conduct regional business.

CONTRACT EDUCATION

NOT-FOR-CREDIT PROGRAMS

Examples:

Fee based offerings and trainings

Results:

May prepare participants for local certificates or licensing by outside agencies.  Does not result in a college transcript.

NON-CREDIT PROGRAMS

Examples:

Courses in 10 categories including 4 comprising Career Development and College Preparation (CDCP)

Results:

Certificates of Completion or Competency, and Adult High School Diplomas

CREDIT PROGRAMS

Examples:

Courses, Degree Applicable, Program Applicable, Stand Alone, Transferrable, Articulated/C-ID

Result in:

Degrees (AA, AS, ADT), Certificates of Achievement, (18 Unit and Higher, 12-18 Unit, or Low-Units)

K14 TAP’S (REGIONAL) – FORMERLY KNOWN AS SB1070 DIRECTORS

Regional TA Provider:
K-14 Pathways (formerly SB1070 Directors)
Tanya Meyer
530.283.0202
tmeyer@frc.edu

Teri Munger
916.484.8021
mungert@arc.losrios.edu

Northeast Bay
Janine Kaiser
kaiser@compasspolicy.com

Southwest Bay
Sharon Turner
650.949.6967
turnersharon@fhda.edu

Bob Hawkes
661.336.5047 office
661.364.6134 cell
bhawkes@kccd.edu
Karen Nicolas
Karen.nicolas@canyons.edu
Natalie Ray
619.644.7826
natalie.ray@gcccd.edu
Susanne Mata
951.487.3435
smata@msjc.edu
Los Angeles – LACCD Colleges
Dr. Laura Cantu
323.265.8646
cantulb@elac.edu

Los Angeles County – Non-LACCD Colleges
Lyla Eddington
818.519.4212
562.908.3422
leddington@riohondo.edu

Orange County
Stephanie Feger
714.438.4834
sfeger@cccd.edu

KEY TALENT

People who provide expertise, support and facilitation of specific subject matter throughout the state.

Including but limited to TAP’s, SN’s, DSN’s, K14 Regional TAP’s (formerly known as SB1070 Directors), COE’s, and others.

TAP (STATEWIDE) – TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE PROVIDER

http://doingwhatmatters.cccco.edu/WEDDGrants/GranteeRoles.aspx#tap

Key Talent who provide expertise, support and facilitation of specific subject matter throughout the state.

Apprenticeship/Prop 39 Nicolas Esquivel, nesquivel@cccco.edu
916.445.4670
Twitter: @calapprentice
CACareerCafe.com
Twitter: @CACareerCafe
Susan Coleman, scoleman@occ.cccd.edu
949.551.6041 (cell)
Twitter: @occsusan
Centers of Excellence
see regional matrix above for contact by region
Laura Coleman, First Contact
916.563.3235 | colemal@losrios.eduJohn Carrese
415.452.5529 | jcarrese@ccsf.eduMichael Goss
909.652.7754 | michael.goss@chaffey.eduZhenya Lindstrom
909.652.7753 | zhenya.lindstrom@chaffey.edu

Theresa Milan
916.563.3221 | milant@losrios.edu

Lori Sanchez
909.274.6106 | lsanchez144@mtsac.edu

Nora Seronello
seronellon@mjc.edu

Communications; eUpdates; eAlerts Margo Turner Mead
margo@FCMEducation.org
Contract Education & Alternative Fee Structures Sandra Sisco
951.264.0889 (cell) | ssisco@mtsac.edu
Curriculum Approval Practices Dianna Ciabotti
707.256.7764 | dchiabotti@napavalley.edu
Internship Back-End Payroll Services Tim Aldinger
916.491.4499 | taldinger@foundationccc.org
K-14 Career Pathways Angela Allison, Statewide Technical Assistance Provider (TAP)
909.952.1514 | ms.angela.allison@gmail.com Sean Glumace, Statewide Technical Assistance Provider (TAP)
562.706.8999 | sean@glumace.com
Launchboard; Common Metrics & Accountability Measures Kathy Booth
510.302.4208 | kbooth@wested.orgRenah Wolzinger
714.658.7980 | Rwolzin@wested.org
Twitter: @renahwolzinger
Legislative Affairs Raul Arambula, rarambula@cccco.edu
(please consult only after vetting issue with the Vice Chancellor/Dean)
Leadership and Coordination Support (EDPAC/WEDPAC) Justin Wallace
661.362.3788 | Justin.Wallace@canyons.edu

WBL – WORK BASED LEARNING

http://www.connectedcalifornia.org/curriculum/work_based_learning

In addition to the core academic and technical components of a pathway, we believe that students must also have a comprehensive and effective work-based learning experience that is connected to what they learn in the classroom. This exposure helps sharpen students’ desire to increase knowledge and develop skills that are relevant to their career interests. These work-based learning opportunities can take the form of job shadowing, intensive internships, virtual apprenticeships, and school-based enterprises.

WCC – WORKFORCE CREDENTIALS COALITION

http://doingwhatmatters.cccco.edu/LaunchBoard/WorkforceCredentialsCoalition.aspx

The California Community Colleges along with North Carolina’s community college system today launched a national workforce credentials initiative to develop common data standards and data sharing agreements among industry and professional certifying bodies, an effort seen as critical to improving alignment between employers and workforce training providers.

WDB – WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT BOARD

http://cwdb.ca.gov/

Established by Executive Order in response to the mandate of the federal Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 (Public Law 105-220), the Board assists the Governor in setting and guiding policy in the area of workforce development.

The California Workforce Development Board (State Board) is responsible for assisting the Governor in performing the duties and responsibilities required by the federal Workforce Investment Act of 1998.

All members of the Board are appointed by the Governor and represent the many facets of workforce development – business, labor, public education, higher education, economic development, youth activities, employment and training, as well as the Legislature.

WIOA – WORKFORCE INNOVATION AND OPPORTUNITY ACT

https://www.doleta.gov/wioa/

The Department of Labor (DOL), in coordination with the U.S. Departments of Education (ED) and Health and Human Services (HHS), is working diligently to ensure that states, local areas, other grantees, and stakeholders are prepared for the implementation of WIOA. The WIOA Resource Page provides information and resources for States, local areas, non-profits and other grantees, and other stakeholders to assist with implementation of the Act. This page is updated to reflect newly developed materials, including responses to frequently asked questions.

TAACCCT – TRADE ADJUSTMENT ASSISTANCE COMMUNITY COLLEGE CAREER TRAINING

https://doleta.gov/taaccct/

TAACCCT provides community colleges and other eligible institutions of higher education with funds to expand and improve their ability to deliver education and career training programs that can be completed in two years or less, are suited for workers who are eligible for training under the TAA for Workers program, and prepare program participants for employment in high-wage, high-skill occupations. Through these multi-year grants, the Department of Labor is helping to ensure that our nation’s institutions of higher education are helping adults succeed in acquiring the skills, degrees, and credentials needed for high-wage, high-skill employment while also meeting the needs of employers for skilled workers. The Department is implementing the TAACCCT program in partnership with the Department of Education.

 

STFWF – STRONG TASKFORCE WORKFORCE

http://doingwhatmatters.cccco.edu/StrongWorkforce.aspx

The recommendations of the Task Force on Workforce, Job Creation, and a Strong Economy are the result of months of deliberations based on input from a wide variety of sources reflecting agreement from both internal and external stakeholders of the community college system. These recommendations enhance career technical education and workforce training to meet the demands of the economy and the labor market, thus benefitting individuals, communities, and the entire state.

SPA – STATEWIDE PATHWAY ALIGNMENT

The Statewide Pathway Alignment effort began as an effort to foster statewide alignment on key issues affecting the policies and practices within CTE and improving the outcomes.  Originally it began with three workgroups, but has recently expanded to four.

  • DATA
  • DUAL ENROLLMENT
  • SECONDARY TO POST SECONDARY ARTICULATION/CREDIT BY EXAM
  • CAREER PATHWAYS

Workgroups consist of CCCCO, CDE, Industry, K12 and CC faculty and staff, and other interested parties.

If interested contact Angela at ms.angela.allison@gmail.com for more information.

SN – SECTOR NAVIGATOR

http://doingwhatmatters.cccco.edu/Contact.aspx

http://doingwhatmatters.cccco.edu/WEDDGrants/GranteeRoles.aspx#sn

Key talent assigned to specific industry statewide to help improve connections with K12, Community College, and Industry.

SLINGSHOT INITIATIVE

https://www.doleta.gov/Performance/Results/AnnualReports/PY2013/CA-PY13_WIA_AnnualReport.pdf  (PAGE 18)

The promotion of regional partnerships, system coordination and the integration of resources and funding streams around target industry sectors and clusters is being successfully implemented through the State Board’s “SlingShot” initiative. The SlingShot initiative seeks to seed collaborative efforts by employers and industry, government, workforce and economic development, and education stakeholders within a region to identify and then work to solve employment challenges that slow California’s economic engine — with regionally-selected solutions to regionally-defined problems.

SDICRC – SAN DIEGO IMPERIAL COUNTIES REGIONAL CONSORTIA

http://myworkforceconnection.org/

Connecting industry sector employers, community college career technical program providers and students with a regional-based framework that simplifies and clarifies partnerships which result in a stronger regional economy and reduces the jobs skills gap – this is what the regional consortium can do for you!

 

SCCRC – SOUTH CENTRAL COAST REGIONAL CONSORTIA

http://sccrcolleges.org/

There are eight member South Central Coast Region Colleges whose service areas encompasses the south central coast of California including all of Ventura County, north through Santa Barbara County, to San Luis Obispo, east to the northern end of Los Angeles County in Santa Clarita and onward into the Antelope Valley, over 9,000 total square miles. Home to over 2.2M people, this region is characterized by small and mid-sized metropolitan communities and expansive rural areas.

SB70 – SENATE BILL 70 (CA)

http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/gi/sb7007summary.asp

In 2005, the Governor’s Initiative on Improving and Strengthening Career Technical Education (CTE) was successfully carried through Senate Bill (SB) 70 by Senator Scott. SB 70 allocated $20,000,000 from the Community College reversion account to be specifically used for the improving of CTE at both the community college and secondary level. The bill allowed for CDE to be an active and full partner in the development of the plan to carry out this important initiative. The CDE Career and Workforce Innovations (CWI) Unit provides the leadership in this work. For the past five years, CWI Unit staff have met and conferred on the plan for the funds to be dispersed to the CTE field. In 2006, SB 1130 was signed by the Governor to continue this important work with additional funding for the next five years through the 2013-14 fiscal years.

SB1070 – SENATE BILL 1070 (CA)

http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201120120SB1070

SB 1070, Steinberg. Career Technical Education Pathways Program.
Existing law, until January 1, 2013, establishes the California Community Colleges Economic and Workforce Development Program. Existing law requires the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges, as part of the program, to assist economic and workforce regional development centers and consortia to improve, among other things, career-technical education pathways between high schools and community colleges, as specified.

SOC CODES – STANDARD OCCUPATIONAL CLASSIFICATION

http://www.bls.gov/soc/

http://www.onetonline.org/help/online/search

The Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) System is a United States government system of classifying occupations. It is used by U.S. federal government agencies collecting occupational data, enabling comparison of occupations across data sets.

 

TOP CODES – TAXONOMY OF PROGRAM CODES

http://extranet.cccco.edu/Portals/1/AA/Credit/2013Files/TOPmanual6_2009_09corrected_12.5.13.pdf

The Taxonomy of Program (TOP) is a system of numerical codes used at the state level to collect and report information on programs and courses, in different colleges throughout the state, that have similar outcomes. At the college level, local program titles often differ substantially from college to college. For example, one college has a program called “Mechanized Agriculture,” another has a program called “Agriculture Engineering Technology,” and a third has one called “Agriculture Equipment Operations & Maintenance.” Because they have similar outcomes, information on all three is collected and reported at the state level under TOP code 0116.00, which carries the standardized title “Agricultural Power Equipment Technology.” The TOP was designed to aggregate information about programs. However, a TOP code must also be assigned to every course in our system.1 Although the TOP does not contain as many specific choices as would a system designed for courses, each course should be given the TOP code that comes closest to describing the course content.

CURRICULUM INVENTORY

http://curriculum.cccco.edu/

Chancellors Office inventory of all community college curriculum.

RFP – REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL

A request for proposal (RFP) is a solicitation, often made through a bidding process, by an agency or company interested in procurement of a commodity, service or valuable asset, to potential suppliers to submit business proposals.[1] It is submitted early in the procurement cycle, either at the preliminary study, or procurement stage.

RFA – REQUEST FOR APPLICATION

DEFINITION

A type of solicitation notice in which an organization announces that grant funding is available, and allows researchers and other organizations to present bids on how the funding could be used. The Request For Application (RFA) will typically outline what type of programs are eligible, what the expectations are and how applications are submitted and reviewed.

 

PERKINS – CARL D PERKINS ACT

http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/pk/

Federal act established to improve career-technical education programs, integrate academic and career-technical instruction, serve special populations, and meet gender equity needs.

PD – PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Opportunities for faculty, administrators and staff to increase their knowledge, skills and practices that are timely and relevant to the changing world of work and education.

OCCRL – OFFICE OF COMMUNITY COLLEGE RESEARCH AND LEADERSHIP

http://occrl.illinois.edu/

Our mission is to use research and evaluation methods to improve policies, programs, and practices to enhance community college education and transition to college for diverse learners at the state, national, and international levels.

NFNRC – NORTH FAR NORTH REGIONAL CONSORTIA

http://nfnrc.org/

The North/Far North Regional Consortium (N/FNRC) is one of seven consortium established by the Chancellor’s Office of the California Community Colleges through competitive grant.  The N/FNRC includes 15 member colleges, geographically from Sacramento to the south, the Oregon border to the north, the Pacific Ocean to the west, and the Nevada state line to the east.

LMI – LABOR MARKET INFORMATION

LLA – LINKED LEARNING ALLIANCE

http://www.linkedlearning.org/

Linked Learning is a proven approach that is transforming education for California students by integrating rigorous academics with career-based learning and real world workplace experiences. Linked Learning ignites high school students’ passions by creating meaningful learning experiences through career-oriented pathways in fields such as engineering, health care, performing arts, law, and more. When students love what they’re learning, they work harder, dream bigger, and learn more.  Four Pillars:  Equity, Sequenced CTE Courses, Work Based Learning, and Integrated Educational Experience

LAOCRC – LOS ANGELES ORANGE COUNTY REGIONAL CONSORTIA

http://www.laocrc.org/

The Los Angeles and Orange County Regional Consortium (LAOCRC) will provide local and regional decision makers with the increased capacity to measure regional progress toward goals of efficiency and effectiveness, while also improving their access to indicators that measure student/incumbent worker progress through the educational system.

JSPAC – JOINT SPECIAL POPULATIONS ADVISORY COMMITTEE

http://www.jspac.org/

The mission of the CA Perkins JSPAC is to promote equity and success in CTE for students from special populations by providing educators research based professional development, instructional strategies and resources.

JFF – JOBS FOR THE FUTURE

http://jff.org/

Jobs for the Future is a national nonprofit that works to ensure educational and economic opportunity for all. We develop innovative career pathways, educational resources, and public policies that increase college readiness and career success, and build a more highly skilled workforce. With over 30 years of experience, JFF is the national leader in bridging education and work to increase mobility and strengthen our economy.

IEDR – INLAND EMPIRE DESERT REGION

http://www.desertcolleges.org/

The Desert Regional Consortium consists of 13 community colleges and two community college districts in Riverside and San Bernardino counties. It serves as a regional framework to communicate, coordinate, collaborate, promote and plan career and technical education and workforce and economic development in the Inland Empire/Desert Region.

EWD – ECONOMIC AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

http://www.cccewd.net/index.cfm

Economic and Workforce Development (EWD) is an integral part of the California Community Colleges and its Doing What Matters for Jobs and the Economy framework, investing funding and resources in industry sectors that are key to California’s economic growth. EWD’s industry-specific workforce services are coordinated through a system of sector specialists that align community college and other workforce development resources with the needs of industry sectors and occupational clusters through a regional focus. The goal is to invest in the skills of California’s workforce – now and in the future – through partnerships with business and industry that result in highly specialized industry training, technical consulting and business development. The end result is to meet industry’s need for skilled workers.

DWM – DOING WHAT MATTERS FOR JOBS AND THE ECONOMY

http://doingwhatmatters.cccco.edu/

Doing What Matters for Jobs and the Economy

Among the activities of the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office, the programs of the Division of Workforce and Economic Development bridge the skills and jobs mismatch and prepare California’s workforce for 21st century careers. The Division serves as administrator for several streams of state and federal funds, including Governor’s Career Technical Education Pathways Initiative (SB70), Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006, and Proposition 98 dollars for Apprenticeship, Economic & Workforce Development (EWD), and Career Technical Education (CTE).

The Division collaborates with employers, organized labor, local communities, and their community colleges through programming supported by these funds to close the skills gap and to foster successful student completion.

DSN – DEPUTY SECTOR NAVIGATOR

http://doingwhatmatters.cccco.edu/Contact.aspx

http://doingwhatmatters.cccco.edu/WEDDGrants/GranteeRoles.aspx#dsn

Key talent assigned to specific industry to assist colleges and regions in improving connections with K12, Community College, and Industry.

DOLETA – DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION (US)

https://www.doleta.gov/

United States Department of Labor and Training Administration

DOE – US DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

http://www.ed.gov/

Our mission is to promote student achievement and preparation for global competitiveness by fostering educational excellence and ensuring equal access.

CVML – CENTRAL VALLEY MOTHER LODE REGION

http://crconsortium.com/

The Central/Mother Lode Regional Consortium is a collaboration of community college faculty and staff and regional workforce and economic development organizations that serve the Central and Mother Lode region. The CRC supports regional economic growth by facilitating development and growth of college training and educational programs to meet the needs of regional businesses and industries.

CTO – CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER

CTE FUND – CTE FOUNDATION SONOMA COUNTY

http://ctesonomacounty.org/

Established in 2012 by private donors as a Committee Advised Fund of the Community Foundation of Sonoma County, the Fund’s intent was to expand and enhance career technical training and work readiness for Sonoma County students. The founders sought to align education with the workforce and economic development needs of the County, and they quickly gained the financial support of the John Jordan Foundation and the County of Sonoma.

CTE – CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

CSSO- CHIEF STUDENT SUPPORT OFFICER

http://cssofficers.org/directory/regions.php

Current Directory of Chief Student Support Administrators

CONNECT-ED – THE CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR COLLEGE AND CAREER

http://www.connectedcalifornia.org/home

TRANSFORMING EDUCATION THROUGH LINKED LEARNING

Mission

ConnectEd partners with communities to transform education through Linked Learning, ensuring that all students, regardless of background, graduate ready for college, career, and life.

COE – CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE

http://www.cccewd.net/initiative_coe.cfm

Centers of Excellence

Inform – through real-time regional and local labor market research and data validated by industry partners.

Connect – business and industry with community colleges, and workforce and economic development professionals who are committed to developing an outstanding workforce.

Advance – the economic and workforce development mission of California’s community colleges in partnering with business and industry and preparing the workforce to succeed in the future.

CLP – CAREER LADDERS PROJECT

http://www.careerladdersproject.org/

The Career Ladders Project works in partnership with California Community Colleges statewide to provide educational and career advancement opportunities for all Californians.

CLASP- CENTER FOR LAW AND SOCIAL POLICY

http://www.clasp.org/

http://www.clasp.org/issues/postsecondary

Postsecondary education and credentials are key to economic mobility for individuals and economic competitiveness for our nation. Yet too many low-income adults and disadvantaged youth are locked out of the opportunity to earn credentials and are falling further and further behind. The Center advocates for better policies, more investment, and increased political will to address this national challenge.

CIP CODE – CLASS OF INSTRUCTIONS PROGRAMS

https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2002/cip2000/

https://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/cipcode/Default.aspx?y=55

The purpose of the Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) is to provide a taxonomic scheme that will support the accurate tracking, assessment, and reporting of fields of study and program completions activity. CIP was originally developed by the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) in 1980, with revisions occurring in 1985 and 1990. The 2000 edition (CIP-2000) is the third revision of the taxonomy and presents an updated taxonomy of instructional program classifications and descriptions.

CIO – CHIEF INSTRUCTIONAL OFFICER

http://ccccio.org/directory/

Also knows as Vice Presidents of Instruction or VPI

Current Directory of CIO/VPI’s

CID – COURSE IDENTIFICATION NUMBERS

http://www.ccccurriculum.net/c-id/

In 2006, the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges responded to legislative calls for a common course numbering system through the implementation of the Course Identification Numbering System (C-ID). This supranumbering numbering system provides a common, intersegmental mechanism to help in the identification of similar courses. Typically, these courses are lower division major preparation courses that have been approved by UC and CSU campuses as meeting articulation standards.

A-G Courses

http://www.ucop.edu/agguide

University of California A-G Course Guide

CWEE – COOPERATIVFE WORK EXPERIENCE EDUCATION

Cooperative Work Experience Education and Internships (Intern/Co-op) is a program where students apply what they have learned in the classroom to an internship or job. Eligible students may earn college credits.

NCCPA – NORTHERN CALIFORNIA CAREER PATHWAY ALLIANCE

http://www.ncpathwayalliance.org/

Our Mission: The Northern California Career Pathways Alliance (NCCPA) facilitates the creation of integrated educational pathways to career success for high school and community college students, while fostering economic and workforce development to benefit students, employers, and the community.

CATEMA – CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION MANAGEMENT APPLICATION

http://doingwhatmatters.cccco.edu/portals/6/docs/Using%20CATEMA%20for%20the%20LaunchBoard.pdf

What is the CATEMA System? The Career And Technology Education Management Application (CATEMA) System provides a comprehensive user-friendly web interface for linking courses, classes, school districts, high schools, teachers, counselors, college registrars, college advisors, and students. The system enables teachers to create records for dual enrollment courses and courses that are linked to articulation agreements and to validate course completion for students who have created accounts that are associated with the courses. Colleges can also record whether students received college credit for a course through dual enrollment or credit by exam. This information can then be shared between K–12 institutions and colleges to better understand student performance and support advising.

CITD – CENTERS FOR INTERNATIONAL TRADE DEVELOPMENT

http://citd.org/

Established in 1989, the California Centers for International Trade Development (CITD) are funded by the Chancellor’s Office of the State of California to promote the state’s international trade and competitiveness, assist exporters and importers, and advance economic and job growth. The CITDs assist California business to expand internationally as well as help colleges become more globalized.

CALPASS PLUS

https://www.calpassplus.org/

Cal-PASS Plus, created through leadership and funding by California Community College Chancellor’s Office, is an accessible, actionable and collaborative pre-K through 16 system of student data.

LAUNCHBOARD

http://doingwhatmatters.cccco.edu/launchboard.aspx

https://www.calpassplus.org/LaunchBoard/Home.aspx

The CTE Launchboard, a statewide data system supported by the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office and hosted by Cal-PASS Plus, provides data to California community colleges and their feeder K-12 school districts on the effectiveness of CTE programs. This information is intended to facilitate local, regional and statewide conversations about how to improve student transitions from K12 to college and on to the workforce. Click here to see videos on the LaunchBoard tools.

In January 2016, LaunchBoard 2.0 will be released. Users will be able to view visual reports that answer questions like “are the right number of people being trained for available jobs” and “are there equity gaps in student outcomes” in addition to detailed data tables on student characteristics and outcomes. Click here to get a sneak peak of the new features.

AB288 – ASSEMBLY BILL 288

https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201520160AB288

AB 288, Holden. Public schools: College and Career Access Pathways partnerships.

Existing law authorizes the governing board of a school district to allow pupils whom the district has determined would benefit from advanced scholastic or vocational work to attend community college as special part-time or full-time students, subject to parental permission. Existing law requires credit to be awarded to these pupils, as specified, authorizes a school principal to recommend a pupil for community college summer session if the pupil meets specified criteria, and prohibits the principal from recommending more than 5% of the total number of pupils from any particular grade level who completed that grade immediately before the time of recommendation for summer session attendance.

CCLC – COMMUNITY COLLEGE LEAGUE OF CALIFORNIA

http://www.ccleague.org/

The Community College League of California (“League”) is a nonprofit public benefit corporation whose voluntary membership consists of the 72 local community college districts in California.

Mission

The Community College League of California promotes student access and success by strengthening colleges through leadership development, advocacy, policy development and district services.

Goals

Advance the League as the primary advocacy organization for community college districts.
Promote effective leadership at all levels for community colleges.
Deliver outstanding services and programs that engage districts and support their operations.
Be a highly effective and innovative organization.

CEO – CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (PRESIDENT/PROVOST)

Presidents and or Provost’s of Community Colleges in California are sometimes referred to as CEO’s or Chief Executive Officer.

CDEMC – CDE MODEL CURRICULA

http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/ctemcstandards.asp

Career Technical Education Standards for California Public Schools

Education Code Section 51226 provides legal authority to develop the CTE standards and framework. This legislation requires the development and adoption of CTE standards that incorporate the integration of career technical and academic education no later than June 1, 2005. The original CTE Model Curriculum Standards were adopted by the State Board of Education (SBE) on May 11, 2005. The standards, written for grades seven through twelve, specify learning goals in 58 career pathways organized around 15 industry sectors.

CDE – CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT EDUCATION

http://www.cde.ca.gov/

California will provide a world-class education for all students, from early childhood to adulthood. The Department of Education serves our state by innovating and collaborating with educators, schools, parents, and community partners. Together, as a team, we prepare students to live, work, and thrive in a multicultural, multilingual, and highly connected world.

CCPT – CALIFORNIA CAREER PATHWAYS TRUST

http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/pt/

In July 2014, the California Legislature passed and the Governor signed into law the California Education Code, sections 53010 through 53016, and the Budget Act of 2014, Statutes 2014, creating the California Career Pathways Trust. Funds in the amount of $250 million will be made available to school districts, county superintendents of schools, direct-funded charter schools, regional occupational centers or programs operated by a joint powers authority, and community college districts in the form of one-time competitive grants.

CCCCO – CALIFORNIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CHANCELLORS OFFICE

http://www.cccco.edu/

The mission of the California Community Colleges Board of Governors and the Chancellor’s Office is to empower the community colleges through leadership, advocacy and support.

 

CCCAOE – CALIFORNIA COMMUNITY COLLEGE ASSOCIATION FOR OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION

http://www.cccaoe.org/

The Voice for Career Technical Education/Economic and Workforce Development in the California Community Colleges

The California Community College Association for Occupational Education (CCCAOE), was founded in 1967 as a technical support group for administrators of “vocational education programs” in the community colleges. As the California Community College mission changed, so has CCCAOE’s mission to become what is now recognized as the premier source of leadership and advocacy for career and workforce preparation. The core purpose of the organization is to strengthen communities and improve lives by preparing current and future generations for the workforce.

CCCAOE’s focus includes developing effective leaders at the local, regional and state levels; providing opportunities to build relationships and connect to statewide leaders;use innovation and technological efficiencies to disseminate information and best practices at the statewide and local levels as well as informing the membership on policy issues related to CTE and EWD.

CBEA – CALIFORNIA BUSINESS EDUCATION ASSOCIATION

http://www.cbeaonline.org/

The California Business Education Association, Inc. (CBEA) represents professionals involved in education for and about business, marketing, and related information technologies at all levels of education in public and private institutions.

The prime mission of CBEA is to recognize, encourage, and promote excellence in business disciplines. Also, it is to collaborate with other disciplines and other groups dedicated to this mission.

 

CBE – CREDIT BY EXAM

http://asccc.org/sites/default/files/Appendix%20C%20CREDIT%20BY%20EXAM%20PAPER_0.docx

Students whom have taken an articulated high school course may be able to earn college credit by choosing to participate in a credit by examination process. Specific credit by examination processes vary by institution.

Title 5 regulations permit high school students to earn college credit that is notated on a college transcript credit through credit by exam mechanisms, with no residency requirement. Local policies can enable students to earn college credit for their high school work at no cost or minimal cost to the student in a way that neither compromises the integrity of the college course nor disrupts the smooth transition of a student from high school to college. Such practices are effective in providing high school students college level coursework in a high school setting and provide faculty across segments an opportunity to collaborate to benefit students.

BSI – BASIC SKILLS INITIATIVE

http://www.cccbsi.org/websites/basicskills/images/basicskills_booklet-2.pdf

Assisting the underprepared student to attain the basic skills needed to succeed in college-level work has been a core function of community colleges throughout their history. This is a major task, with 70 to 80% of students in the CCC needing work in developmental mathematics and English courses. Even with only slightly more than one in every three entering students actually enrolling in a basic skills class, this translates into nearly one-half million students enrolling in English and mathematics classes considered below college level, with additional enrollments in basic skills reading and English as a Second Language (ESL) courses.

BIW – BUSINESS INFORMATION WORKER

http://ict-dm.net/biw

Business Information Worker coursework is current, providing knowledge and skills demanded in today’s workplace.

With a solid foundation in Microsoft Windows andOffice as well as strong digital and web literacy skills, the Business Information Worker brings efficiency and productivity to the workplace.

Completion of the Business Information Workerpathway also brings indispensable critical thinking,problem solving, and interpersonal skills to theworkplace, essential components of thecurriculum

BACCC – BAY AREA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CONSORTIA

http://www.baccc.net/

The Bay Area Community College Consortium (BACCC) is comprised of the 28 colleges surrounding the San Francisco and Monterey Bays. Funded by the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998, the BACCC supports activities and projects that meet the four objectives of the Act:

  • Improving the Academic skills of vocational and technical education
    students;
  • Strengthening connections between secondary and postsecondary education;
  • Preparing individuals for occupations in demand that pay family-supporting
    wages;
  • Investing in effective, high quality programs.

The BACCC serves as a framework to enhance the coordination of regional programs; to increase collaboration on regional priorities; and to serve as a link between colleges Career Technical Education programs, Economic and Workforce Development Initiatives, and the Chancellor’s Office.

ASCCC – ACADEMIC SENATE CALIFORNIA COMMUNITY COLLEGES

http://asccc.org/

Formed in 1970, the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges is a 501(c)6 nonprofit organization. Created for the promotion and advancement of public community college education in California, its general purposes are:

  1. To strengthen local academic senates and councils of community colleges;
  2. To serve as the voice of the faculty of the community colleges in matters of statewide concern;
  3. To develop policies and promote the implementation of policies on matters of statewide issues;
  4. To make recommendations on statewide matters affecting the community colleges.

The Academic Senate gets its authority to strengthen local senates on California community colleges statewide from the California Code of Regulations Title 5 Section 53206, which says:

(a) An Academic Senate for the California Community Colleges has been established through ratification by local academic senates or faculty councils so that the community college faculty of California may have a formal and effective procedure for participating in the formation of state policies on academic and professional matters.

(b) The Board of Governors recognizes the Academic Senate of the California Community Colleges as the representative of community college academic senates or faculty councils before the Board of Governors and Chancellor’s Office.

AB86 – ASSEMBLY BILL 86

http://extranet.cccco.edu/Divisions/WorkforceandEconDev/AB86AdultEducation.aspx

The California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office and the California Department of Education are tasked with implementing AB 86 Section 76, Article 3 to provide planning and implementation grants to regional consortia of community college districts and school districts for the purpose of developing regional plans to better serve the educational needs of adults.

AEBG – ADULT EDUCATION BLOCK GRANT

http://aebg.cccco.edu/

The California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office (CCCCO) and the California Department of Education (CDE) are working in partnership to implement the requirements outlined in the Adult Education Block Grant (AEBG). We will continue to provide guidance and solicit feedback from the field throughout the implementation process.